Some writers you have (probably) never heard of

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Female writers have been at it just as long as men, yet often have been overlooked by history as unimportant. Male pan names have been used, and even JK Rowling only used her initials for fear of being rejected a s a female author.

Here are some more female authors that you’ve probably never heard of.

1. Alice Ruth Moore Dunbar Nelson (1875-1935):

Alice Ruth Moore Dunbar Nelson was an American poet, journalist and political activist. Born in New Orleans, she  as one of the great African Americans at the heart of the Harlem Renaissance. Moore graduated in 1892 and worked as a teacher. Her diary provides insight into the harsh lives of black women at the time facing many difficulties was published.

2. Zitkala-Sa (1876-1938):

Zitkala-Sa was a Native American Sioux writer, teacher and political activist. She wrote about the struggles that she faced in her youth trying to live somewhere between American culture and her Native American heritage.  American Indian Stories is one of her more famous works  and showcases her writing as well as her strident political views.

3. Ann Petry (1908-1997): 

The first  woman to sell a million copies of her book in America, Anne Petry won the Houghton Mifflin Literary Fellowship for her novel. the book was Inspired by her experiences as a poor Black woman and what she saw around her, including the neglected children in Harlem.

4. Nathalia Crane (1913-1998):

Just nine years old when she was published, Crane wrote The Janitor’s Boy and her novel The Sunken Garden. When she got older, she became a professor of English at San Diego State University.

5. Jean Stafford (1915-1975):

The Collected Stories of Jean Stafford in 1970 won the Pulitzer Prize. Her first novel, Boston Adventure, was a best seller. She wrote many short stories too, which were published in The New Yorker and various literary magazines.

Kindle versions

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hi guys,

we’re still having some issues getting kindle versions to fit the format correctly here at Indigo Rising UK, but we are working on it.

Edit: That appears to have sorted it.

Submission Deadline – 9/6/2013

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Hey guys,

The time of reckoning is upon us!

Please send your submissions to only one editors address, whether poetry@indigorisinguk.com,prose@indigorisinguk.com or flash@indigorisinguk.com

Please read the guidelines before sending your work. We do not pay for work, and neither do we get paid. It’s a labour of love.

The issue will be published in June, with the deadline 9/6/13. We have an international readership, with thousands of people visiting the site and a readership in the low hundreds.

Many thanks,

Jem