Indigo Rising UK

: Literary magazine


Villains

Maleficent by chill07 - Deviant Art

 

From Tumblr comes this very helpful guide on how to create an effective villain.

Writing villains is fun. It’s a great way to set up the conflict that your story will need, but a badly written antagonist with unexplainable motivations is often the downfall of a story.


Our Two Year Anniversary

Novel

It’s our two year anniversary today. Two years of getting submissions, reading through them, emailing, advertising, compiling, arguing over who gets to go in the issue, deciding on everything from website layout, fonts and front covers. It has been great. All of the editors are wonderful to work with, and we are all really proud of our achievements.

The next few months are going to see Indigo Rising UK bloom from just a magazine to a news source and site full of literary ephemera.

For now, here’s China Miéville on novel writing for beginners.

You’re talking about writing a novel, right? I think it’s kind of like…do you know Kurt Schwitters, the artist? He was an experimental artist in the 1940s who made these very strange cut up collages and so on and very strange abstract paintings. And I was just seeing an exhibition of his, and one of the things that is really noticeable is he is known for these wild collages, and then interspersing these are these really beautiful, very formally traditional oil paintings, portraits, and landscapes and so on.
And this is that old—I mean it’s a bit of a cliché–but the old thing about knowing the rules and being able to obey them before you can break them. Now I think that that is quite useful in terms of structure for novels because one of the things that stops people writing is kind of this panic at the scale of the thing, you know? So I would say, I would encourage anyone that’s writing a novel to be as out there as they possibly can. But as a way of getting yourself kick-started, why not go completely traditional?
Think three-act structure, you know. Think rising action at the beginning of the journey and then some sort of cliff-hanger at the end of act one. Continuing up to the end of act two, followed by a big crisis at the end of act three, followed by a little dénouement. Think 30,000 words, 40,000 words, 30,000 words, so what’s that, around 100,000 words. Divide that up into 5,000 word chapters so you’re going 6/8/6. I realise this sounds incredibly sort of drab, and kind of mechanical. But my feeling is that the more you can kind of formalise and bureaucratise those aspects of things. It actually paradoxically liberates you creatively because you don’t need to worry about that stuff.
If you front load that stuff, plant all that out in advance and you know the rough outline of each chapter in advance, then when you come to each day’s writing, you’re able to go off in all kinds of directions because you know what you have to do in that day. You have to walk this character from this point to this point and you can do that in the strangest way possible. Whereas if you’re looking at a blank piece of paper and saying where do you I go from here you get kind of frozen. The unwritten novel has a basilisk’s stare, and so I would say do it behind your own back by just formally structuring it in that traditional way. And then when you have confidence and you’ve gained confidence in that, you can play more odder games with it. But it’s really not a bad way to get started.

Happy writing!


Issue #4

Hey folks,

Here’s issue 4, a day later than expected but marvellous nevertheless.

PDF here

Alternative PDF here: issue 4

Kindle here

We hope you enjoy reading as much as we have.

the Indigo Team

Edit: Added Andy Cashmore’s name to his piece. (sorry!)

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